Transitions

An IiT Blog


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Dealing with Regional Bigotry

CASI Director Devesh Kapur and doctoral student Ananth Padmanabhan discuss the growing problem of “hate crimes” against out of state migrants in India in a recent guest column in Business Standard. They discuss the tension between the idea of common Indian citizenship and preferential “sons of the soil” policies and provide some suggestions for how to provide better protection for migrants from the Northeast who face harassment. Read the article here.

Dr. Devesh Kapur, Director of CASI

Devesh Kapur

Ananth Padmanabhan

Ananth Padmanabhan


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India’s unease with free speech

CASI Visiting Fellow Anuradha Raman
CASI Visiting Fellow Anuradha Raman

Anuradha Raman, CASI Spring Visiting Fellow and Senior Associate Editor with the Political Bureau of Outlook Magazine, is the author of this week’s India in Transition (IiT) article on the shrinking grounds for free speech in India. Read the article here. Learn more about the CASI Visiting Scholars/Fellows program.

“Today, India continues its banning spree, reflecting the deep and growing unease with the freedom to express, an unease which goes back to the time when the Constitution was seventeen months old and measures were put in place to check its steps forward. Since then, twenty-five books have been officially banned, including Joseph Lellyweld’s Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi and His Struggle with India, James Laine’s Shivaji: Hindu King in Islamic India, and Aubrey Menen’s The Ramayana.” Continue reading…
 

Raman also spoke at CASI on the same topic during our April 23rd noontime lecture. A video from the event is found below.


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Ordinance Raj in India

Check out the newest India in Transition publication, Constitutionally Lawless: Ordinance Raj in India by Shubhankar Dam, Associate Professor of Law at Singapore Management University School of Law. In it, he discusses the loosely interpreted Article 123 of the Indian Constitution, granting the president the right to issue ordinances when it is “necessary for him to take immediate action.” Dam argues that “the Indian story of ordinances, then, is effectively a story about the loss of constitutional meaning.” For more on Dam’s research, check out his recent book, Presidential Legislation in India: The Law and Practices of Ordinances.