Transitions

An IiT Blog


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Unsafe After Sunset

The Hindu published the final part of our 4-part series on the Aspirations and Anxieties round of the Lok Surveys on Friday February 27. The article, “Unsafe after sunset”, highlights how respondents answered the question, “What is the latest time that you feel safe returning home alone?” and was written by Milan Vaishnav of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and Neelanjan Sircar of CASI.

Our data also show that urbanisation is not a panacea for concerns about public safety. Rather, cities must invest in the “right kind” of urbanisation, with the sort of infrastructure seen in the largest cities. These cities have better amenities (such as street lights) and often have buses or even a metro that runs reliably until late at night. This demonstrates the positive secondary effects on the larger social environment when building infrastructure.

Follow the authors on Twitter: @MilanV @NeelanjanSircar

Read the other parts in the series:

Part 1: Being middle class in India

Part 2: Choosing thy neighbour

Part 3: The love for sons and appropriate attire

Read more about the Lok Pre-election Survey


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The love for sons and appropriate clothing

In the third installment of CASI’s 4-part series in The Hindu, we discuss findings from the latest round of the Lok Surveys on questions related to gender. We find that attitudes on the appropriateness of women’s clothing, which we feel to be a measure of social control, are quite different between rural and urban India. The urban, wealthier, and more educated were the least conservative about what women should wear. However, when we examined the preference that respondents have for sons over daughters, levels of son preference did not vary significantly by the income level, education, or rural/urban status of the respondent, highlighting how deeply rooted this attitude remains in Indian society. Read the article “The love for sons and appropriate clothing” by Megan Reed and Devesh Kapur.

The other two parts in the series:

1) “Being Middle Class in India”

2) “Choosing thy Neighbor”

Also read about the Lok Pre-election Survey

Dressing UP


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Choosing thy neighbour

OPED_MAP_new_eps_2273951g

Read new analysis from the Lok Surveys on social bias in today’s The Hindu. This article comes as the latest installment of a four-part series presenting results from the second round of the Lok Surveys. In the article, CASI’s Post-doctoral Research Fellow Neelanjan Sircar and Research Coordinator Megan Reed discuss findings regarding caste and religious bias in preferences for neighbors. Those identifying as middle class displayed much higher levels of social bias than those who do not. To the extent that the social mobility associated with middle class identification results in people from different identity groups competing for the same jobs and resources, middle class identity, we speculate, may actually amplify rather than attenuate social conflict explaining this difference is reported bias. Read more of the findings in “Choosing thy Neighbour.”

The Lok Surveys are a multi-year panel study sponsored by the Lok Foundation and carried out in collaboration with the Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI) at the University of Pennsylvania, in conjunction with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The Lok Surveys aim to track the attitudes of Indians over the next several years, as part of a significant new effort to understand the social and political reconfigurations taking place across India today. CMIE, on behalf of the Lok Foundation, conducted face-to-face interviews of 69,920 randomly selected Indians across 25 states and union territories between January and May 2014. 2011 Read the first article in the series “Being Middle Class in India.” Also read about and view data on the Lok Pre-election Survey. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Being Middle Class in India

CASI has just released new analysis from the second round of the Lok Surveys! The article, the first in a four-part series to be published in The Hindu, is the first public presentation of the emerging findings from the Aspirations and Anxieties round of the survey. The Lok Surveys are a multi-year panel study sponsored by the Lok Foundation and carried out in collaboration with the Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI) at the University of Pennsylvania, in conjunction with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The Lok Surveys aim to track the attitudes of Indians over the next several years, as part of a significant new effort to understand the social and political reconfigurations taking place across India today. CMIE, on behalf of the Lok Foundation, conducted face-to-face interviews of 69,920 randomly selected Indians across 25 states and union territories between January and May 2014. Because our sample is about two-thirds urban and one-third rural, 2011 Census data is used to reweight the sample to ensure urban/rural representativeness.

Read the article “Being Middle Class in India” here.

Dr. Devesh Kapur, Director of CASI

Devesh Kapur

Milan Vaishnav

Milan Vaishnav

Learn more about the authors: CASI Director, Devesh Kapur, and Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Milan Vaishnav.

Follow CASI on Twitter @CASIPenn
and Milan Vaishnav @MilanV


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India on the Move: Unraveling the Black Box of Commuting

S Chandrasekhar

S. Chandrasekhar

“We need to put commuting on equal footing with migration in any conversation on worker mobility, since it is no longer a case of either/or” argues CASI Visiting Scholar S. Chandrasekhar in the latest India in Transition (IiT) piece. Chandrasekhar is an Associate Professor at the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research (IGIDR) and has worked extensively on labor mobility. In the article, he presents data and case studies which convincingly demonstrate the massive growth of the commuter population in India. Read the full article.

Read more about Chandrasekhar’s research on his website and attend his lecture at CASI on November 14. Details about the event will be posted soon here.


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Dealing with Regional Bigotry

CASI Director Devesh Kapur and doctoral student Ananth Padmanabhan discuss the growing problem of “hate crimes” against out of state migrants in India in a recent guest column in Business Standard. They discuss the tension between the idea of common Indian citizenship and preferential “sons of the soil” policies and provide some suggestions for how to provide better protection for migrants from the Northeast who face harassment. Read the article here.

Dr. Devesh Kapur, Director of CASI

Devesh Kapur

Ananth Padmanabhan

Ananth Padmanabhan

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